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Health, Not Diets

Weight-neutral practice professional development and consultancy

Blog

Blog

I get asked loads of HAES theory, research and practice questions (which I love) by email. I started this blog in order to share selected responses in case any others had similar queries. Got a question you'd like me to blog about? Just send me an email :-)

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The National Weight Control Registry proves anyone can lose weight and keep it off!

Posted on January 13, 2017 at 12:10 AM Comments comments (58736)

From a colleague:

 

"People can and do maintain weight loss. For example, look at the National weight Control registry in the USA"

 

My response:

 

The National Weight Control Registry is a list of people (10,000 in the US, so the equivalent here would be 750 people out of Australia's population) w...

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But there are significant risks for mortality with increased BMI!!

Posted on January 12, 2017 at 11:50 PM Comments comments (14234)

From a fellow dietitian:

"I do believe there are significant risks for mortality with increased BMI, irrespective of diet. I have seen studies supporting that, so I don’t think it’s a slam dunk for embracing any level of obesity. See the latest BMJ systematic review for example:

 

 

ht...

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How does using "food guides" and "balanced plate models" fit into the HAES philosophy?

Posted on January 12, 2017 at 11:10 PM Comments comments (8745)

In Australia we have the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating, which is essentially a pie chart version of MyPlate, but at least uses pictures of actual food to demonstrate the sorts of foods which belong in each food group. The guide is basically a summary of the observational studies which link diet with adequate nourishment, longevity and chronic disease. The serve sizes I explain as a unit of measurement, a way for nutrition scientists and dietitians to 'count' and describe someone's diet...

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